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Category Archives: Equilibrium

Grant opportunities in New South Wales and Victoria

The NSW government has announced four grants available to improve recycling and waste services.  

> Organics Infrastructure: $6 million is available to support the processing of organic waste. This grant is available to local businesses, councils and projects that upgrade, build and expand organics processing infrastructure. Applications close October 21.

> Organics Collection: $12 million is available to support councils and regional organisations tied to councils to divert FOGO waste from kerbside collection. Applications close October 28.

> Circular Solar Grants: $7 million is available for government organisations councils research organisations, industry and not for profits for the development of innovative schemes that recycle and battery waste and solar panels. Applications close November 4.

> Litter Prevention Grants: $2 million is available for community litter reduction projects and schemes. These initiatives could include cigarette butt bin installations or community clean up days. Applications close November 8.

Round two of Innovation Fund grants open for applications in Victoria

In Victoria funding is available to support collaborative projects that aim to design out waste, improving both economic and environmental outcomes. Applications for both streams are open for projects that emphasize action within all phases of a resources’ lifecycle, promoting circular economy initiatives.

The two streams of funding available are:

>Stream One: Textiles Innovation: Between $75,000 – $150,000 of funding is available per project. Grants are available for projects which have a focus on preventing textile waste. Applications are open to industry groups, businesses, charities and research institutions.

> Stream Two: Collaborative Innovation: Between $150,000 and $250,000 of funding is available for each project. Grants are available to businesses, industry groups, charities and research institutions. Projects must have a collaborative focus on preventing waste from multiple organisations within a specific region, supply chain or sector.

The closing date for both Victorian grants is Monday 15th of November at 11:59pm.

Waste Export License

The Australian Government has implemented the Waste Export Ban, and has begun to regulate the export of Australian of certain wastes.

As of July 2021, glass and mixed plastics “waste” are regulated for export. Baled and whole tyres are set to be regulated from the 1st of December and other materials  including cardboard and mixed paper by July 2022. Separate requirements are required for hazardous waste.

Each type of waste stream will have its own regulation start date and rules. To continue to export waste, organisations will have to:

>Meet the requirements and rules or be exempted
>Declare each consignment
>Hold a waste export license for the waste type

Under this ban, exporters and organisations which meet these specific requirements are able to apply for a license to export regulated waste overseas. Waste export licenses are granted for a period of up to three years for organisations who meet certain criteria.

Equilibrium has developed a guide and can help with the waste export license application. For more information please contact us or visit the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment website.

Manufacturing and Life Cycle Assessment

The manufacturing industry plays an important role in global economic development, however it contributes to a significant share of negative environmental impacts in the form of pollution and waste. Manufacturing companies are subject to increasing pressure from consumers and legislation to improve their own activities towards more environmentally conscious manufacturing processes which create less environmentally damaging products. This pressure calls for product designers and production engineers to identify improvement measures for existing manufacturing systems, as well as create innovative concepts for new products. These investigations need to consider the entire life cycle of the manufacturing system and product, including the impacts related to production, use and end of life disposal. 

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool used by companies and product designers to better understand their products’ overall and complete impacts – positive and negative. It helps businesses to quantify impacts at the various stages and provides insights  to improve performance and reduce environmental impacts. 

Why undertake an LCA? There are various reasons:

Stakeholder and consumer expectations: Increasingly consumers are seeking products with reduced environmental impacts, this is reflected in product purchasing choices.
> Industry directions: The manufacturing industry in Australia has a leading role in improving sustainability of its products.
> Voluntary environmental management systems: ISO 14001 is driving continuous improvement and uncovering business efficiency. 

While the key objectives for an LCA often begin with aiming to better understand environmental footprint, the framework can be used to assess other issues including economic and social factors. Examples may include:

> Uncovering production losses, which manufacturing business may refer to as ‘scrap rates’.
> Identifying areas of high energy use, where if savings can be made, will reduce costs and greenhouse emissions.
> Transport and logistics reviews may reveal options to reduce emissions and save costs.
> Raw materials choice for manufacture, including reviewing supplier social procurement practices to protect business reputation.

Businesses that are currently assessing their internal footprint are already on the path to developing an LCA. Examples of this include energy efficiency studies, where energy per unit production helps set a benchmark for assessing business improvements. 

If you would like to know more about LCA’s and how an LCA study may help your business development please contact us.

A simple diagram of life cycle assessment

 

 

Review of Standards and Specifications for Recycled Content

This project uncovered a diverse range of issues and views, from high-level structural themes through to leadership capacity and very specific observations about particular material types, standards and performance.

Equilibrium was engaged by the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment to undertake a review of current Australian standards and specifications for recycled content products including providing details on current documentation for the use of recycled materials in product manufacturing, buildings and infrastructure works.

As part of the engagement Equilibrium consulted with key stakeholders on their views as to whether the absence of any particular standards or specifications may be obstructing the take-up of recycled materials. Stakeholder interviews also canvassed broader factors influencing increased use of recycled materials.

The report contains a list of current standards and specifications as well as a compilation of the consultation results, general findings and recommendations.  Appendix A of the report is available as a separate MS Excel file.  Also attached is a summary report containing examples from the main report, as well as information gained from interviews with stakeholders.

Your can download a copy of the report and appendices here.

For NSW’s response to create end markets by fostering demand for recycled products, read our blog post here.

More information

Damien Wigley
General Manager
Equilibrium
damien@equil.com.au

 

 

NRMA – Child restraint recycling trial a triple-whammy win for community

Road safety, environmental benefits and regional jobs: a program that can deliver on any of these targets could expect the support of NRMA, so a scheme that has ready-made outcomes for all three gets our full attention – and it deserves yours too.

Add to that the fact that children and the disabled are the primary beneficiaries and it’s clear that the child car safety seat stewardship trial has the potential to deliver enormous positives for the community.

In order to ensure a permanent recycling program, Equilibrium must demonstrate significant community engagement and support. People with used and expired child restraints are urged to drop them at the following locations to support this valuable trial:

Kiama Community Recycling Centre: 446 Riverside Dr, Minnamurra.

Penrith Community Recycling Centre:Gate 3, 96 Dunheved Circuit, St Marys.

Tamworth Community Recycling Centre: 123a Forest Road, Tamworth.

Nudgee Resource Recovery Centre, 1402 Nudgee Rd, Nudgee Beach, Queensland

Willawong Resource Recovery Centre, 360 Sherbrooke Rd, Willawong, Queensland.

Reedy Creek Community Waste and Recycling Centre, 61 Hutchinson Street, Burleigh Heads, Queensland.

Darebin Resource Recovery Centre, 30 Kurnai Avenue, Reservoir Victoria

That’s Rubbish – Why Your Business Should Be Considering an EMS

Every organisation will have an impact on the environment. However you might be surprised to learn the extent of the environmental impact that your day-to-day operations are having. The costs to the environment and your bottom line are greater than you think.

Consider a small office-based organisation. Large amounts of paper may be printed from energy-hungry printers that do not have their default set to double-sided print. Lights and temperature control may be left on when not needed and staff air travel contributes not just to frequent flyer points, but also to global greenhouse emissions.

Fortunately there are ways to reduce the environmental footprint of your business that go beyond simply changing to eco-friendly light bulbs. An Environmental Management System (EMS) is a long-term structured solution that can help your business manage its environmental impact while increasing business efficiency.

What is an Environmental Management System Exactly?

Just about every astute business will have an integrated financial management system in place that will help to monitor the financial performance of the company. Similarly, an EMS is a structured framework that monitors the environmental performance of a company and integrates environmental compliance into the daily operations of your business.

An EMS is a powerful tool for your business to simultaneously increase business efficiency while improving its environmental performance.

How can my business benefit by implementing an EMS?

Rather than being a passive bystander, an effective EMS will prompt your business to actively examine its practices. Reviewing your operations and activities to identify the environmental impact of your business may reveal that certain processes and equipment are chewing up more power or contributing more waste than you can afford.

An EMS will then guide you through the process of developing targets, responsibilities, priorities and actions that help to manage environmental impact in a way that is unique to your organisation.

Some of the benefits you can come to expect with a properly integrated EMS include:

> Maximising the efficient use of company resources;
> Reducing waste;
> Saving on utilities such as electricity and water;
> Creating environmentally sustainable company policies in purchasing and transport;
> Demonstrating a good corporate image while growing your customer base;
> Building staff engagement and awareness in environmental issues;
> Gaining a better understanding of the environmental impact of business activities;
> Ensuring compliance with environmental regulations and minimising environmental liabilities.

What Next?

Equilibrium has worked with a large range of organisations of varying types and sizes to assess their need for an EMS and the likely costs and benefits. From logistics to offices, from telecommunications to retailers, Equilibrium has experience and insights that can efficiently and effectively indicate the benefits an EMS can deliver.