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Tag Archives: Low carbon

Vote #1 Environment, Transport

​Transport emissions are increasing in Australia and produce almost 20% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, 60% of that  is from cars alone. Consequently, rapid growth of alternatives including electric vehicles (EV) is an environmental policy area of interest this election. As fuel prices and momentum on climate change rise, pressure is building for governments to provide incentives and policies to ease the switch from traditional fuel engines to cleaner vehicles.

Current policy proposals from each party offer different strategies and pathways / offer different avenues for such a transition.

The current Coalition Government announced $250 million to be invested in electric vehicles,  mainly to support EV charging infrastructure. Building infrastructure alone delivers no tax or other financial support for Australians to make the switch.In July 2021 the government also invested $260 million to increase its diesel reserves, notably more than the investment in EV.

Labor  has announced plans to introduce an Electric Car Discount to come in effect in July 2022. A major component of the discount is to exempt many electric cars from import tariffs (5% tax on some imported EV cars) and fringe benefits (a 47% tax on EV that are provided through work for private use). These exemptions will only be for cars below the luxury car threshold ($77,565, as of 2021), aiming to encourage car manufacturers to supply more affordable EV models to Australia. These incentives will cost the government around $200 million over three years, it’s unclear what percentage of this will go to infrastructure or to discounts.

The Greens launched a “Spark the EV Revolution” campaign, a plan to institute a range of incentives and subsidies to make electric vehicles affordable to everyone. The Greens plan to remove stamp and registration duty on all new EVs, remove import tariffs and waive registration fees for the first three years of ownership. To pay for these purchase incentives, the party plans to implement a 17% luxury fossil fuel car tax on the value of all fossil fuel light vehicles over $65K for the next four  years. They have also pledged to spend $151 million on fast charging infrastructure.

Leaders in EV technology have started to announce phase out dates for new sales of fossil fuel cars, including Norway (2025), The Netherlands (2030), India (2030) and the UK (2040). The Netherlands has had the most take up to date, with EV currently making up more than one in four vehicles on the road. A stronger commitment like this from Australia would see manufacturers prioritizing the delivery of newer, cheaper models to Australian markets. Accessibility is a key element, otherwise EV technology will remain a luxury commodity and represent inequality rather than the way to our renewable future.

2050 Modelling Shifts Net Zero Leadership to Industry

The Australian Government commitment to net zero emissions by 2050 could well be the embodiment of former Indian Mahatma Ghandi’s famous quote: “There go my people, I must hurry to catch up with them for I am their leader”.

The market has spoken. Business and the community is already moving ahead of Government on greenhouse emissions. Equilibrium has been fortunate to see this first hand as for a number of years it has worked with progressive companies on reducing emissions – and this activity has accelerated over the last 24 months independent of Government.

The Australian Government has now released “Australia’s Long Term Emissions Reduction Plan”. The plan provides a summary of the modelling and analysis which underpins the emissions target of net zero by 2050.

The modelling focuses on industry and businesses taking a voluntary approach to achieve net zero by 2050, without outlining constraints or incentives. This shift to net zero is to be pushed by “investor expectations” and “consumer preferences”. Fortunately, Australian businesses are well advanced in assessing their carbon outputs and are already working towards contributing to the target.

For example, Equilibrium was engaged by a major food manufacture in 2019-2020 to identify their carbon outputs and a carbon reduction plan. The company is now well advanced on a carbon management program that is aligned to its overall business objectives.

The process involved identifying scope 1 emissions (direct emissions eg. production, manufacturing and transport emissions), scope 2 (indirect emissions, emissions that may be generated at another facility) and scope 3 emissions (indirect emissions, employee travel to work/ transport and disposal of waste). The company set a target to achieve net zero emissions in operations and net-zero climate impact across the value chain by 2040, as well as 2025 interim goals to reduce energy, water and waste.

Equilibrium assists businesses with a wide range of services from carbon accounting to Climate Active accreditation. Please get in touch to develop realistic and measurable approaches to reduce your carbon outputs.

GC2018 – Low Carbon Competition

Major events provide an unmatched opportunity to demonstrate how environmental issues and impacts can be effectively managed through good planning, effective design and efficient delivery.

The Gold Coast Commonwealth Games 2018 (GC2018) are no exception, and the commitment to staging a sustainable event was embedded from the outset. Leadership in sustainability was a key driver for GC2018, as was the need to help ensure a positive legacy beyond the Games.

The Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation (GOLDOC) committed to showing leadership in sustainability by delivering GC2018 to international standards of best practice.

Sustainability was approached in a considered and comprehensive manner at all stages. In their own words the Games organisers noted the importance of systems thinking and best practices standards:

Guiding our GC2018 delivery is the ISO 20121 event sustainability management system and the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework  Sustainability Reporting Standards.”  Source: https://www.gc2018.com/about/sustainability

Three key sustainability pillars were identified for GC2018:

> Source responsibly
> Manage our impacts
> Inspire inclusive, active communities

Identifying, managing and mitigating carbon emissions

Being part of the sustainability solution for delivering GC2018 was a wonderful opportunity for Equilibrium.

We were invited in partnership with Tasman Environmental Markets to assist with the development of a strategy and baseline emission profile for the GC2018 carbon emissions generated through the design and delivery phases and to establish a mitigation and management plan for the delivery of a carbon responsible Games. This included those emissions:

> under the control or influence of GOLDOC;
> ‘owned’ or ‘shared by GOLDOC;
> occurring as a consequence of GC2018 (‘associated’ emissions), where it is possible to reasonably estimate those emissions; and
> of high stakeholder interest.

While presenting major business and tourism opportunities for Queensland, GC2018 also provided a significant opportunity to limit any negative social, economic or environmental impacts. This also translated into achieving a lasting legacy for the Gold Coast region more generally.

The estimated carbon footprint also allowed GOLDOC and its delivery partners to prioritise opportunities for carbon reduction activities and other cost-effective mitigation strategies. It will also serve as a baseline (along with the carbon management plan) to allow GOLDOC to assess its performance in reducing its carbon impact.

The calculation of the Carbon Baseline was undertaken in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol as adopted under the National Carbon Offset Standard (NCOS).

Challenges

Being the first Commonwealth Games organising committee to quantify and manage carbon emissions, there was no precedent or baseline to allow a comparison and therefore an expected estimation of the magnitude of the carbon emission profile.

Where possible actual (or estimated) energy (electricity and fuel use) data, flight itineraries, and quantities of waste generated and disposed of or collected for recycling, were used to calculate carbon emissions. This however was not always possible to obtain or to quantify.

In the absence of being able to obtain operational information, an estimate of carbon emissions by activity was undertaken using an input / output (I/O) analysis model. This required detailed financial expenditure breakdown expenditure together with an assessment of whether each line item was purchased outright (goods or equipment component) or provided under hire arrangement, or as a service by the supplier (hire or service component).

Secondary considerations that were included in the modelling considered the end-of-life fate of any outright purchases attributable by GOLDOC to the operations in addition to potential legacy benefits of outright goods or equipment purchases versus supply (services) or hire arrangements.

The complexity was ever present as was the need to make informed estimates.

Where GOLDOC made a shared financial contribution but were not the responsible delivery partner eg. towards a venue upgrade or capital building and construction activity, (where these emissions are largely out of GOLDOC’s control or influence), these emissions were included for the purpose of providing a complete assessment of the GC2018 carbon profile in addition to an estimation of spectator travel impacts.

Our work with Tasman Environmental Markets highlighted the importance of addressing carbon reduction and climate change objectives through good design, effective planning and efficient event delivery.

Importantly, we also believe that the collaboration will provide a noteworthy benchmark for future Commonwealth Games and the methodology required to effectively identify, manage and mitigate carbon emissions.

Equilibrium is very pleased to have been part of the team which contributed to GC2018 and its sustainable delivery.

For more information contact:

Damien Wigley, Equilibrium
Mobile: 0404 899 961  Email:  damien@equil.com.au