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Tag Archives: Victorian Government

Recycling Victoria: A New Economy

The Victorian Government is seeking to improve the performance of the waste and recycling sector, and has released a 10-year policy and action plan – Recycling Victoria – to reform the system with a focus on the circular economy.

Victoria exports approximately 1.27million tonnes of paper, plastic and cardboard each year overseas, and this includes 30% of all recycling collected from Victorian households.

The figures are compelling; it is estimated that by 2046, Victorians will create 40% more waste than in 2017-18. The extent of the activity and industry development is significant as highlighted by the total quantum of funding that has poured into Victorian waste and resource recovery initiatives; $134 million from the Victorian Government since 2015.

You can download a copy the Recycling Victoria policy here.

A four bin waste and recycling system, a container deposit system (CDS), a circular economy business innovation centre, landfill levy reform and increased funding for infrastructure, are among the package of measures outlined in the policy.

The policy in part talks about the transition to a circular economy and the importance of taking action across the life-cycle of materials to maximise value and minimise waste.

Four specific goals

Four specific goals guide the process of moving from a take-make-waste model, to a more system-wide approach that seeks to be circular, sustainable and economically responsible.

These four goals are aimed at taking a smarter approach to making, using, recycling and managing products, buildings, infrastructure and materials.

Goal 1 – Design to last, repair and recycle

Generate less waste in businesses through innovation and design; use recycled materials in products and consider impacts across product life cycles; and support business to explore new circular economy business models.

Targets and outcomes include:

> 15 per cent reduction in total waste generation per capita between 2020 and 2030.

> Divert 80% of waste from landfill by 2030, with an interim target of 72% by 2025.

> Cut the volume of organic material going to landfill by 50% between 2020 and 2030, with an interim target of 20% reduction by 2025.

Goal 2 – Use products to create more value

Help people make smart purchasing decisions and extend the life of products and support the reuse economy; repair goods where possible.

Targets and outcomes include:

> 15% reduction in total waste generation per capita between 2020 and 2030.

> Support Victorian communities and council to reduce waste.

> Prevent plastic pollution.

> Support the reuse economy.

Goal 3 – Recycle more resources

Reform kerbside collections to generate more value from waste; improve the separation of recyclable materials; develop markets for recovered materials; plan for and boost investment in recycling infrastructure; embed the waste hierarchy in the management of materials; support the development of appropriate waste to energy facilities.

Targets and outcomes include:

> Divert 80% of waste from landfill by 2030, with and interim target of 72% by 2025.

> Halve the volume of organic material going to landfill by 50% between 2020 and 2030, with an interim target of 20% reduction by 2030.

> 100% of households have access to a separate food and organics recovery service or local composting by 2030.

Goal 4 – Reduce harm from waste and pollution

Protect communities and the environment from high-risk and hazardous wastes.

Targets and outcomes include:

> Support safe and effective high-risk and hazardous waste management.

> The Vic Gov will consider the potential introduction of new levies for waste being stockpiled for long periods, recover avoided waste levies and disposal fee for illegally stockpiled wastes, ensure adequate disposal point of asbestos across the state.

> The Victorian Government spends an estimated $58 million each year in clean-up costs at abandoned waste sites and $105 million each year to respond to stockpile fires. Clean-up costs and lost landfill levy revenue from illegal dumping equates to $30 million a year.

Monitoring and measuring progress

Of course, accurate data and transparency will be key to monitoring the reforms and their intended outcomes. More specifically the Victorian policy outlines it ‘key commitment’ to expanding Victorian’s waste data systems by:

> Establish a framework for monitoring progress towards the circular economy, including the identification of indicators and metrics

> Introduce a new waste and recycling data system to enable better waste management and circular economy monitoring

> Continuing to provide public waste and recycling market intelligence reporting.

The reforms in the Recycling Victoria policy herald an important and necessary opportunity for government, industry and the community to work together to improve kerbside recycling, invest in priority infrastructure and better manage high-risk and hazardous waste.

Recycling Victoria also outlines additional initiatives that can support waste avoidance and behaviour change, further develop waste to energy options and meet community and local council expectations for reliable services.

Equilibrium will be assisting its clients across diverse industries and sectors to adopt specific elements and aspects of the Recycling Victoria policy.

If you have any questions about the  policy and how your organisation can benefit, implement or comply with specific goals, please contact the team at Equilibrium:

Nick Harford on 0419 993 234 or Damien Wigley on 0404 899 961.

Stewardship for solar panels attracts attention

As rooftop solar continues to boom, the future fate of photovoltaic panels is attracting greater scrutiny including active investigation of a national stewardship scheme to manage their recovery, refurbishment and recycling.

A recent story by ABC News investigated the growing pressure to ensure that end-of-life solar panels do not end up in landfill, especially given the valuable and scarce materials used to make them in the first instance.

The expected volumes of old and damaged panels is growing  with the ABC story reporting that 1,500 kilotons of obsolete PVs likely to reach end-of-life by 2050. This highlights the need to develop and implement national solutions, including potential stewardship programs that result in effective, safe and environmentally sound decommissioning and recycling of panels.

Sustainability Victoria is leading a national project to examine photovoltaic systems and assess possible options for stewardship programs to potentially manage the products at end-of-life.

The project is timely given the recent ban of ewaste to landfill in Victoria, which includes solar panels, inverters and battery storage.

Equilibrium was appointed by Sustainability Victoria to undertake an analysis and assess potential options for a national product stewardship approach.

Solar panels and associated products and equipment have been identified as a rapidly growing e-waste stream in future years.  For the Sustainability Victoria project “PV systems” have been defined to include panels and PV system accessories such as inverter equipment and energy storage systems.

For more information about Sustainability Victoria’s project on stewardship for PV systems look here.

More information

For more information contact Nick Harford at nick@equil.com.au or mobile 0419 993 234

 

A circular economy policy for Victoria

The transition to a circular economy is underway across industries, sectors and communities. Noteworthy practical measures are in play as are policy development processes across all levels of government.

The Victorian Government has also commenced public consultation on developing a circular economy policy and action plan to be released in late 2019.

An issues paper has been released and invites input, ideas and circular economy stories to help shape and inform a draft policy for further consultation during September and October 2019.

The deadline for submissions is 2 August 2019 and additional detail on how to provide feedback can be found here.

A circular economy pathway can facilitate system-wide transformation across the economy and portfolios with  potential to deliver responsible prosperity that is planned and sustainable.

The policy will be supported by a ten year action that will outline more specific initiatives on how the Victorian Government will involve the community, industry and other relevant stakeholders.

The consultation process provides a valuable opportunity to solicit input that can move beyond conventional waste management activities with a view to achieving higher levels of waste avoidance and sustainable materials management that is restorative, regenerative and low carbon.

Equilibrium will be responding to the issues paper on behalf of clients and we look forward to supporting other organisations share their views and solutions with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning.

More information

For more information contact Nick Harford at nick@equil.com.au or mobile 0419 993 234

 

 

 

 

 

New Victorian Regulations Released Early

The Victorian Government is releasing new environmental regulations earlier than expected.

The new environmental regulations will form a key pillar for increased EPA enforcement powers and tougher penalties, particularly when it comes to environmental risk prevention.

In short, the new regulations will provide the EPA with expanded powers to regulate businesses to reduce the risk of environmental harm and pollution.

The earlier than expected release means that businesses should become familiar with the new legislation and likely compliance issues.

The EPA has noted some specific sectors for attention under the new regulations, including those involving high-risk activities such as chemical manufacturing, food and beverage processing, waste management, recycling, plastic fabrication moulders, organics processing and agriculture.

A recent report in Footprint News[1] said Victoria’s ‘consolidated environmental regulations to support Victoria’s new environment law will be released for comment in July’.

Consultation is planned

The process for consultation has yet to be detailed, however, according to Footprint News, it is expected that specially arranged consultations with current EPA licence holders will be conducted. These businesses can expect some change, particularly with licence reviews, potentially requiring the development of new systems and processes to ensure ongoing compliance.

Businesses that do not currently operate under an EPA licence should also look closely at the potential impacts of the new laws, and where possible take early action. This would include ensuring a full understanding of environmental risks, and factor-in sufficient time to budget for any operational changes that may be needed.

As the regulations are introduced, businesses that operate potentially high-risk activities are likely to see an increased level of interest from the EPA. High-risk activities include materials recycling, waste handling, chemical storage, and other activities that may generate hazardous emissions or odours.

In essence, these types of activities are inherent to a range of different industries such as chemical manufacturing, food and beverage processing, plastic fabrication, waste management, recycling, organics processors, and agriculture.

Guidance materials

Other activities underway within the EPA includes the development of guidance materials designed to assist businesses to comply with new environmental laws. An example of which includes the Guideline for Management and Storage of Combustible Recyclable and Waste Materials, released in October 2018.

The process for environmental law reform began in 2016 when the Victorian Government conducted a public inquiry into the function of the EPA, which drew particular attention from both business and community into the EPA’s role in preventing environmental harm. This review led to an overhaul of environmental legislation in Victoria and the amended Environmental Protection Act, which is due to commence on 1 July 2020[2].

The EPA is holding information sessions for business and community wanting to learn more about the new environmental laws, and the potential impacts[3].

More information

This article was authored by Nicholas Harford, Managing Director of Equilibrium consultants. He can be contacted at nick@equil.com.au or mobile 0419 993 234

[1] https://www.footprintnews.com.au/

[2] https://www.epa.vic.gov.au/about-us/response-to-epa-inquiry

[3] https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/victorias-new-environment-protection-laws-and-their-impacts-tickets-51953079058

Photovoltaic Systems Stewardship Study

Online survey available for interested stakeholders

Sustainability Victoria (SV) is leading a national project to examine photovoltaic systems and assess possible options for stewardship programs to potentially manage the products at end-of-life.

Product stewardship specialist Equilibrium has been appointed by Sustainability Victoria to undertake an analysis and assess potential options for a national product stewardship approach.

Photovoltaic (PV) panels and associated products and equipment have been identified as a rapidly growing e-waste stream in future years.  For this project “PV systems” have been defined to include panels and PV system accessories such as inverter equipment and energy storage systems.

As part of the project, Equilibrium welcomes input and information from manufacturers, installers, project developers, the energy industry, peak bodies and others .

Information and evidence gathered will support the assessment of potential options.

Stakeholder survey available online

Organisations and individuals interested in the project can complete a short online survey here:  http://bit.ly/PVs-survey

The deadline for completing the survey is COB Monday 27th August 2018.

For more information about the project or the survey, contact Damien Wigley at Equilibrium at:  damien@equil.com.au

 

 

Proposed E-waste Policy Package for Victoria

Public Consultation Commences

The Victorian Government has released a comprehensive consultation package on its proposed approach to managing e-waste in Victoria, including its commitment to ban e-waste from landfills.

The proposed approach will legally ban e-waste from landfill and specify how e-waste must be managed in Victoria from July 2018. The Victorian Government is supporting those who manage e-waste to adapt to these new regulatory requirements with a state-wide education campaign and an infrastructure support program.

The Victoria Government is seeking views and feedback from the community and industry on the package and will accept submissions until 25 January 2018.  The consultation process is being managed by the Waste and Resource Recovery team at the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).

The consultation package contains several draft documents covering regulatory components as well as non-regulatory measures such as infrastructure support and community education awareness activities. Feedback will be used to refine the arrangements for the ban on e-waste from landfill.

The consultation package, including all draft tools, policies and policy impact assessments can be accessed at: www.engage.vic.gov.au/waste/e-waste

Public comment and feedback from all interested parties is possible through the website.

Some key aspects of the package:

1. The package of proposed measures has been developed to reduce e-waste going to landfill, increase resource recovery and support jobs and investment in the recycling sector.

2. For the purposes of the ban, e-waste is defined as any device with a power cord or battery that is no longer wanted or useful. This definition will be further tested during the development of the education and awareness campaign.

3. It is expected that all regulatory requirements for stakeholders will take effect from July 2018. A period of 12 months post policy will allow for the completion of infrastructure upgrades to meet the required standards.

4. The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) will enforce the new requirements in line with their Compliance and Enforcement Policy, and take a risk-based approach. While small volumes of e-waste may filter through to landfill, the EPA will expect measures are in place to manage e-waste and prevent large quantities from entering a landfill.

5. The Victorian approach is a landfill ban or prohibition as opposed to a Product Stewardship program. It is broader than the Commonwealth’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS) in that it includes all e-waste, all items with a power cord or a battery. However, the NTCRS will continue to play a core role in Victoria by ensuring recovery of a large proportion of televisions and computers in the most environmentally-sound manner. The Victorian Government has noted it will continue to advocate for expansion of the scope of the NTCRS to cover more types of e-waste.

Equilibrium is currently undertaking a detailed analysis of the package. If you have any queries or would like to discuss the package, please contact Equilibrium directly.

More information about the consultation package can be accessed at the DELWP website.

More information

John Gertsakis
Director, Communications
Equilibrium
Email: john@equil.com.au
Mobile: +61 409 422 089